Home News BCCI Adopts Lodha Panel Recommendations but not completely

BCCI Adopts Lodha Panel Recommendations but not completely

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The Board of Cricket Control in India decided to adopt the Lodha recommendation omitting out five contentious ones inflicted by the Supreme Court appointed a committee on July 2016. The recommendations were voted in at today’s Special General Meeting after stalling it for well over a year.

BCCI earlier got a major uplift from the Supreme Court as the three-member bench comprising of Justices Deepak Misra, AM Khanwilkar and DY Chandrachud agreed that few recommendations were difficult to impose and they agreed to reconsider those proposals in its next hearing scheduled on August 18.

While talking to media after the meeting, the acting secretary Amitabh Choudhary revealed that all the reforms as per the Apex Court judgment on 18.07.2016 have been accepted without opposition except five reforms.

The reforms that have not been adopted were one state one vote; the size of the national selection panel; the size of the apex council and ones that cover age cap and tenure of office bearers.

Choudhury while describing their viewpoint said, “If we want Railways or Services to retain full membership [voting] rights, then they can only be represented by either a government employee or a minister.”

BCCI is also trying to resolve the conflict of the issue which has hit the board strongly. Talking about Ombudsman issue, Choudhary revealed that a panel has been set up to look into the issue.

Earlier this week, the Supreme Court of India forbade Niranjan Shah and N. Srinivasan, former BCCI officials from attending any board meetings as they were above 70 years of age and as per Lodha reforms no officials above 70 years qualifies to attend any board meetings.

The SGM was summoned in New Delhi to discuss and approve the adoption of the new constitution as per the Lodha Committee recommendations. The BCCI and its constituent state associations had been commanded by the Supreme Court to approve as many recommendations as practicable.

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